Fish cook – Valona Shrimp http://valonashrimp.com/ Fri, 20 May 2022 04:36:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://valonashrimp.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.jpg Fish cook – Valona Shrimp http://valonashrimp.com/ 32 32 Prehistoric excrement discovered in Wiltshire gives clue to culinary skills of Stonehenge builders | UK News https://valonashrimp.com/prehistoric-excrement-discovered-in-wiltshire-gives-clue-to-culinary-skills-of-stonehenge-builders-uk-news/ Fri, 20 May 2022 03:22:23 +0000 https://valonashrimp.com/prehistoric-excrement-discovered-in-wiltshire-gives-clue-to-culinary-skills-of-stonehenge-builders-uk-news/ Ancient feces found near Stonehenge show that its builders may have eaten undercooked cow offal during epic winter feasts. The bizarre find at Durrington Walls, just 2.8km from ancient Wiltshire Stones, dates to 2500BC, when much of Stonehenge was built. And an analysis of the feces found revealed evidence of parasitic worm eggs. This, according […]]]>

Ancient feces found near Stonehenge show that its builders may have eaten undercooked cow offal during epic winter feasts.

The bizarre find at Durrington Walls, just 2.8km from ancient Wiltshire Stones, dates to 2500BC, when much of Stonehenge was built.

And an analysis of the feces found revealed evidence of parasitic worm eggs.

This, according to a team of archaeologists, suggests that locals feasted on the internal organs of cattle and fed the remains to their dogs.

The University of Cambridge-led team investigated 19 pieces of ancient excrement, or coprolite, found at the colony and preserved for more than 4,500 years.

Five of the coprolites (26%) – one human and four dogs – contained parasitic worm eggs.

The researchers suggest this is the first evidence of intestinal parasites in the UK, where the host species that produces faeces has also been identified.

Lead author Dr Piers Mitchell, from Cambridge’s Department of Archaeology, said: “This is the first time that intestinal parasites have been recovered from Neolithic Britain, and finding them in the environment of Stonehenge is really something.

“The type of pests we find are consistent with previous evidence of winter feasting by animals during the construction of Stonehenge.”

Raw or undercooked lungs

Four of the coprolites, including the man’s, contained capillariid worm eggs.

While the parasites infect a wide range of animals, in the rare case that a European species infects humans, the eggs lodge in the liver and do not appear in the stool.

Scientists say evidence of their presence in human feces indicates that the person had eaten the raw or undercooked lungs or liver of an already infected animal, causing the parasite eggs to pass directly through the body. body.

“As capillariid worms can infect cattle and other ruminants, it appears cows were the most likely source of the parasite eggs,” Dr Mitchell explained.

Earlier analyzes of cow teeth from Durrington Walls suggest that some cattle were herded almost 100km from Devon or Wales to the site for a large-scale feast.

Co-author Evilena Anastasiou, who took part in the Cambridge research, said: “The discovery of capillariid worm eggs in human and canine coprolites indicates that people ate the internal organs of infected animals and also fed the remains. their dogs.”

Parasitology – it’s one thing

Professor Mike Parker Pearson, from UCL’s Institute of Archaeology, who excavated the walls of Durrington between 2005 and 2007, added: “This new evidence tells us something new about the people who came here. for the winter festivities during the construction of Stonehenge.

“Pork and beef were roasted on a spit or boiled in clay pots, but it seems the offal was not always cooked so well.

“People didn’t eat freshwater fish at Durrington Walls, so they must have caught the tapeworms in their home colonies.”

The results are published in the journal Parasitology.

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Poached Salmon and Napa Slaw with Citrus-Miso Vinaigrette https://valonashrimp.com/poached-salmon-and-napa-slaw-with-citrus-miso-vinaigrette/ Wed, 18 May 2022 07:51:58 +0000 https://valonashrimp.com/poached-salmon-and-napa-slaw-with-citrus-miso-vinaigrette/ The star of this dish is the deliciously delicious dressing that’s simple to make but brightens up whatever you drizzle. Here the dressing is used in two ways. First, it’s tossed with shredded nappa cabbage, carrot and red onion to make a mouth-watering coleslaw, which is served topped with a butter-poached salmon fillet and drizzled […]]]>

The star of this dish is the deliciously delicious dressing that’s simple to make but brightens up whatever you drizzle. Here the dressing is used in two ways. First, it’s tossed with shredded nappa cabbage, carrot and red onion to make a mouth-watering coleslaw, which is served topped with a butter-poached salmon fillet and drizzled with more magic dressing. It’s an elegant dish that keeps well in the fridge for a make-ahead dinner, or in a cooler to take to work for lunch or for a weekend picnic.

Active time: 50 minutes; Total time: 50 minutes, plus at least 4 hours to cool the salmon

Get ahead: Poached salmon must be prepared and refrigerated at least 4 hours in advance. Coleslaw can be seasoned and refrigerated up to 2 hours before serving.

Storage Notes: Poached salmon can be refrigerated for up to 2 days. The dressing can be refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 4 days.


Servings:

4

Size tested: 4 servings

Ingredients
  • For dressing
  • 3 tablespoons fresh lime juice, plus lime wedges for serving

  • 2 tablespoons of fresh orange juice

  • 2 tablespoons of white miso

  • 2 large green onions, white and light green parts coarsely chopped and dark green parts thinly sliced ​​and reserved for garnish

  • 1 tablespoon of honey

  • 1/4 teaspoon fine salt

  • Pinch of ground white pepper

  • 1/4 cup mayonnaise

  • for the coleslaw
  • 4 cups lightly packed thinly sliced ​​napa cabbage (about 1/2 small head)

  • 1 medium carrot, grated on the large holes of a box grater (about 2/3 cup)

  • 1/4 cup thinly sliced ​​red onion (half moons)


directions

Make the salmon: In a deep skillet with a lid, add enough water to fill about three-quarters full and bring to a boil over medium-high heat, adjusting the heat if necessary. Fill a kettle with a few cups of water and bring to a boil to add later, if needed. Squeeze the lemon into the water in the pan, then place the fish skin side down in the pan. Add more boiling water from the kettle, if necessary, to submerge the fish. Return to a gentle boil, then reduce the heat to low, cover and cook, adjusting the heat to maintain a low simmer until the fish reaches an internal temperature of 125 degrees, 5 to 10 minutes, depending on the fillet thickness. Transfer the salmon to a large plate and let rest for 5 minutes. Cover and refrigerate until completely chilled, at least 4 hours. Before serving, turn the fish over and remove the skin and brown flesh underneath.

Prepare the dressing: in a blender, combine the lime juice, orange juice, miso, white and light green parts of the green onions, honey, salt and pepper in a blender and blend until smooth consistency, stopping to scrape the sides of the mixer with a spatula as needed. Transfer the mixture to a bowl and whisk the mayonnaise until combined. You should get about 1/2 cup. (If you have a large blender that requires more volume to work properly, double the dressing recipe.)

Make the coleslaw: In a large bowl, toss the cabbage, carrot, red onion and about half of the citrus miso dressing until combined.

To serve, divide the coleslaw among four serving plates, top each with a piece of salmon, drizzle the fish with the remaining dressing and garnish with the reserved green onion leaves. Serve with a wedge or two of lime.


Origin of the recipe

From cookbook author and licensed nutritionist Ellie Krieger.

Tested by Olga Massov.

Email your questions to the Food Section.

Email your questions to the food section at food@washpost.com.

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Holy smoke! Breaking down the 4 distinct regions of barbecue in the United States https://valonashrimp.com/holy-smoke-breaking-down-the-4-distinct-regions-of-barbecue-in-the-united-states/ Mon, 16 May 2022 16:34:53 +0000 https://valonashrimp.com/holy-smoke-breaking-down-the-4-distinct-regions-of-barbecue-in-the-united-states/ There is perhaps no more popular culinary pastime, especially in the summer! — than to get together and enjoy a little barbecue when the weather is nice and the occasion is festive. But even those who enjoy barbecuing or grilling at home might not know that the United States is actually known for four barbecue […]]]>

There is perhaps no more popular culinary pastime, especially in the summer! — than to get together and enjoy a little barbecue when the weather is nice and the occasion is festive.

But even those who enjoy barbecuing or grilling at home might not know that the United States is actually known for four barbecue cooking regions.

In honor of Monday being National Barbecue Day, here’s an explainer of what the four barbecue regions are in the United States.


1. Kansas City-style barbecue.

Barbecue in this region is best characterized by two characteristics that stand out.

The first is the sauce, which is sweet and thick with a base of tomato, molasses and brown sugar, according to site Q39.

The other characteristic of the Kansas City style barbecue is the burnt ends. Made from the tips of smoked beef brisket, the ends are cut off and placed in the smoker for a flavorful char on the outside.

A d

Almost all types of meat are smoked in this area of ​​the barbecue, be it pork, chicken, beef, sausage and turkey. The fish is also commonly smoked.


2. Memphis-style barbecue.

The staple of barbecue in this region is pork, although you can still get chicken and beef dishes.

Any meat, especially pork, is slowly cooked in a marinade with 20 to 40 spices added, according to this website.

The Memphis-style barbecue philosophy is to cook the meat more slowly in order to achieve a rich, moist sauce.

The sauce is also a bit spicier than Kansas City barbecue.


3. Texas-style barbecue.

Since Texas is such a large state, different regions have their different methods for preparing barbecue dishes.

In general, the state is best known for its brisket, which can be smoked for around 18 hours, according to webstaurantstore.com.

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Ribs and East Texas Hot Links are also popular dishes, but the centerpiece is beef brisket. The main type of meat used statewide is beef, although there are exceptions in some areas.

Here’s how four Texas regions cook a barbecue, according to traveltexas.com.

  • Central Texas style barbecue. This is where the brisket is smoked in a dry rub for 12-24 hours over mesquite, oak and walnut woods.

  • West Texas style barbecue. The meat is grilled in the open, with a higher heat, which means faster cooking times.

  • South Texas style barbecue. The brisket is smoked for 12 hours in an underground pit, oven or steamer.

  • East Texas BBQ. Sausages and sandwiches are the main staples in this area of ​​Texas, so the emphasis is on making quality sauces for these foods. Pork is also used more in this region than beef in other parts of the state.


4. Caroline-style barbecue.

According to webstaurantstore.com, one of the oldest methods of cooking meat, Carolina-style barbecue, involves cooking a whole pig for 12 to 24 hours.

The pig then produces three kinds of meat: the stomach, the neck and the shoulders.

The stomach meat is tender, while the neck and shoulders are tougher.

From there, a variety of sauces are prepared in the region to make the meat tasty. The most popular type of sauce is mop sauce, which is applied to the meat as it cooks.

A d

Mop sauce is usually vinegar-based, in Carolina-style barbecue.

Mustard-based sauces and sauces that are a combination of vinegar and ketchup are also popular.

What style of barbecue do you prefer? Let us know in the comments below.

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Back to Bali: Banana Leaf Snapper with Sambal and Coconut Salad – Recipe | Indonesian food and drink https://valonashrimp.com/back-to-bali-banana-leaf-snapper-with-sambal-and-coconut-salad-recipe-indonesian-food-and-drink/ Sat, 14 May 2022 22:28:00 +0000 https://valonashrimp.com/back-to-bali-banana-leaf-snapper-with-sambal-and-coconut-salad-recipe-indonesian-food-and-drink/ Iit’s five o’clock in the morning. My niang (grandmother) is bent over her raw brick stove with a bamboo pole in her right hand, stoking the freshly lit fire. “It’s better to fill your mind with beautiful thoughts when cooking,” she says. Maya Kerthyasa prepares ingredients with her niang Anak Agung Rai in Bali My […]]]>

Iit’s five o’clock in the morning. My niang (grandmother) is bent over her raw brick stove with a bamboo pole in her right hand, stoking the freshly lit fire. “It’s better to fill your mind with beautiful thoughts when cooking,” she says.

Maya Kerthyasa prepares ingredients with her niang Anak Agung Rai in Bali

My niang and I have been cooking together for four years now. Our conversations in his kitchen – a traditional open-air pavilion with a wood-fired cooktop – are what brought me back to Bali.

Before that, I had spent most of my life in Australia writing about almost every other cuisine under the sun. On my return trips, I’d head straight for my niang’s cooking – its smoke-tinged rice, delicate broths and flavorful sambals – and wonder why the rest of the foodie world paid so little attention. to Balinese cuisine.

I now understand why. Mon niang’s generation learned and passed on knowledge orally, so the best recipes are rarely recorded on paper, and restaurants rarely have the time and tools to match the depth, complexity and zing of home kitchens. from Bali. Thus, Balinese flavors have flown under the culinary radar, unexplored, for the most part, by chefs, food publications and hungry travelers. These recipes, I hope, will change that.

Sambal matah (raw sambal with lemongrass)

This sambal is similar to a salsa. It is probably Bali’s most beloved condiment and every region, village and household adds its own twist to it. Slice the ingredients as thinly as possible and use your fingers to blend.

Bali's most popular condiment: sambal matah
Bali’s most popular condiment: sambal matah

Makes 250g

150g (about 6) red shallots (Asian)thinly sliced
18 tabasco peppers
thinly sliced
4 stalks of lemongrass
white part only, thinly sliced
6 lime leaves
finely chopped
80ml coconut oil
1 tbsp lime juice
2 teaspoons of shrimp paste
lightly fried
Sea salt
to taste

Using your hands, combine the shallot, chili, lemongrass and lime leaves in a medium bowl.

Heat the coconut oil in a small saucepan over medium heat for three to four minutes and pour it into the mixing bowl.

Allow the mixture to cool slightly and, using your hands, gently press everything together to incorporate the coconut oil into the other ingredients.

Add lime juice and shrimp paste and mix again. Season with salt to taste and you are good to go. Best eaten fresh, not stored.

Urab timun (cucumber salad and burnt coconut)

This cucumber number normally comes out on special occasions. You can reduce or even omit the chiles for less heat if you prefer.

Bright, refreshing and full of contrasting flavors: urab timun
Bright, refreshing and full of contrasting flavors: urab timun

For the salad
220g roasted coconut
finely grated
4 cucumbers
peeled, halved lengthwise and sliced
Sea salt
to taste
4 lime leaves
thinly sliced, to serve
Juice of ½ lime
to serve

For the sambal
4 tablespoons coconut oil
4–5 red shallots (Asian)
thinly sliced
5 garlic cloves
thinly sliced
6 red bird peppers
thinly sliced ​​(optional)
1 teaspoon of shrimp paste
rolled into a ball
Thumbnail-sized piece of small galangal
finely chopped
1 teaspoon of salt

To make the sambal, heat the oil in a small wok over medium heat. Add the shallots and sauté for two minutes, or until they become translucent. Add the garlic and fry, stirring constantly to make sure nothing sticks or burns, for four minutes, or until the garlic and shallots are lightly caramelized.

Add the chili, shrimp paste and baby galangal and cook, stirring, until the shrimp paste is completely dissolved, the chili is wilted and the baby galangal becomes fragrant. Add the salt and mix again, then remove from the heat.

Pour most of the sambal into a bowl, reserving about a handful for seasoning, and mix it with the coconut using your fingers.

Add the cucumber and some of the coconut mixture to a large bowl and mix using your hands. Massage it in well, but be careful not to bruise the cucumber too much, adding more coconut mixture until you’re happy with the cucumber-to-coconut ratio. The cucumber should be well coated but not too soggy.

Season with salt to taste and more sambal for an extra kick, if desired. Garnish with lime leaves and a squeeze of lime juice and enjoy immediately.

Pepes be pasih (grilled spicy snapper in banana leaves)

Pepes be pasih is incredibly popular all over Bali, especially in the coastal areas where you can easily get your hands on fresh seafood. For this recipe, I chose snapper because that’s what we ate growing up. My mom also made this recipe with albacore tuna and octopus, which you should definitely try too. This is one of my favorite ways to cook seafood because the banana leaf locks in all the moisture, the coals give the smoke and the spices add punch, heat and color to the dish. .

Oh, Snap: Grilled Balinese Snapper in Banana Leaves
Oh, Snap: Grilled Balinese Snapper in Banana Leaves

Serves 2

100g of banana leavescut into sheets of 20 × 22 cm
Toothpick
1 teaspoon palm sugar
chopped
100g of basic kuning,
Recipe below
300g snapper fillet
cut in two
1 teaspoon sea salt
2 tablespoons coconut oil
2–3 red shallots (Asian)
sliced
6 garlic cloves
sliced
1 long red pepper
seeded and sliced
2 salam leaves
1 small bilimbi or green tomato
thinly sliced
2 sprigs of carum (lemon basil)
steamed rice
to serve
Urab Timun
to serve above
sambalmatah
to serve above

Add the sugar and base kuning to a small mixing bowl and use your hands to massage them together until fully combined.

Season the fish with salt and add it to the base mixture. Transfer the fish to the refrigerator to marinate for 30 minutes.

Heat the oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the shallot and garlic and sauté for three to four minutes, or until translucent, being careful not to let anything stick or burn. Leave to cool, then mix with the chilli. Once cool enough to handle, massage the marinated fish with the shallot mixture.

Preheat a charcoal grill or barbecue.

Place two pieces of banana leaf on top of each other, then a salam leaf in each bundle.  Place the fish on it
Place two pieces of banana leaf on top of each other, then a salam leaf in each bundle. Place the fish on it.

To make a bundle of banana leaves, place two pieces of banana leaf on top of each other, with the top (shiny) side of the bottom leaf facing the bench and the shiny side of the top leaf facing you. The veins of both leaves should face the same direction.

Place a salam leaf in each foil, place the fish on top, then place a slice of bilimbi or green tomato and carum on top.

Fold one side of the sheet over the fish, then the other side in the shape of a letter.  Secure with toothpicks
Fold one side of the sheet over the fish, then the other side in the shape of a letter. Secure with toothpicks

Fold one side of the banana leaf over the fish, following the grain of the leaf.

Fold the other side of the sheet into a letter fold.

Fold the two ends over and secure them with toothpicks or traditional bamboo sticks.

Grill the packets over medium heat for about eight minutes on each side – the banana leaf should be a little charred as the fish cooks inside.

Gently unwrap the package over a bowl to catch all the juices.

Place the meat on a plate, pour the juice over it and serve with steamed rice, a side of urab timun and sambal matah.

Base kuning (yellow spice paste)

The word base (pronounced bah-surr) refers to spices or spice blends. Basic combinations are best made fresh, but you can make them in bulk and store them in the freezer.

The traditional art of working your food by hand adds a rhythmic element to cooking. We also believe it connects the cook and the ingredients on an energetic level, where the dish becomes an offering of love and intention. So skip the food processor (tempting as that may be).

Makes 450g

15 cm of fresh turmericcoarsely chopped
115g small fresh galangal
coarsely chopped
1 cm fresh ginger
coarsely chopped
115g (about 30) garlic cloves
coarsely chopped
1 red shallot (Asian)
coarsely chopped
3 candle nuts
roasted and coarsely chopped
9 tabasco peppers
coarsely chopped
100ml coconut oil
250ml water
2 teaspoons sea salt
1 teaspoon of sugar

Using a large mortar and pestle, mash the turmeric, small galangal, ginger, garlic, shallot, candle nuts and chilies into a paste. Most Asian supermarkets stock candle nuts, and you can buy them online — or substitute them with their relative, the macadamia nut.

Peacock

Heat the oil in a wok over high heat until it reaches the smoking point. Reduce the heat to medium, add the spice paste and slowly stir in the water for two minutes.

Reduce the heat to low and continue cooking the dough for 45 minutes to an hour, or until all the liquid has evaporated and forms a dark yellow dough.

Add salt and sugar, stir well and cook over low heat for another 10 minutes. Adjust seasoning to taste. It’s ready when it’s deep yellow in color with a crisp aroma and earthy, punchy flavor. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for two to three weeks.

  • This is an edited excerpt from Peacock: Real Balinese Cooking by Maya Kerthyasa and Wayan Kresna Yasa, published by Hardie Grant Books (RRP $50). Photograph by Martin Westlake

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Want to catch some fish this weekend? Here’s how. https://valonashrimp.com/want-to-catch-some-fish-this-weekend-heres-how/ Thu, 12 May 2022 16:20:24 +0000 https://valonashrimp.com/want-to-catch-some-fish-this-weekend-heres-how/ The Minnesota walleye fishery opens on Saturday, May 14. Glen Schmitt from Outdoor News joined me on WJON today. He says the walleye have finished spawning and are looking for food. Schmitt says for the most success, look in shallow water. He says water temperatures in the north will be in the 40 to 50 […]]]>

The Minnesota walleye fishery opens on Saturday, May 14. Glen Schmitt from Outdoor News joined me on WJON today. He says the walleye have finished spawning and are looking for food. Schmitt says for the most success, look in shallow water. He says water temperatures in the north will be in the 40 to 50 degree range with local water temperatures in the mid 50s. Schmitt says this bodes well for walleye fishing . He says channels between lakes, windswept spots and shallow sand or gravel will hold walleyes.

According to Schmitt, the most successful presentation for catching walleye this weekend would be a 1/8 ounce jig with a minnow. He says it wouldn’t go bigger than 1/8 ounce. Schmitt says most bait shops should have a good supply of minnows. He says the bait trappers have been working hard this week. Schmitt says the offer may not be as good as a typical opener, but the minnows offer is better than originally expected.

He says minnows would be the best option at this time of year, with leeches coming later in the year. Schmitt says if you can’t find minnows, the second choice would be shallow crank baits, jigs and plastics. He says a lot of presentation depends on the lake.

Schmitt has a few suggestions for keeping youngsters fishing. He says they don’t depend on catching walleye, but lots of fish like crappie and bluegill which are readily available. Schmitt says to keep it simple for the kids with a bobber, reel and put them on as many fish as possible. He says the bite of crappie and blue gills could be phenomenal.

If you want to listen to my full conversation with Outdoor News’ Glen Schmitt, it’s available below.

2022 Minnesota Vikings draft pick

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“How many more months will we have to suffer?” : Indonesians struggle with expensive cooking oil | Indonesia https://valonashrimp.com/how-many-more-months-will-we-have-to-suffer-indonesians-struggle-with-expensive-cooking-oil-indonesia/ Wed, 11 May 2022 00:02:00 +0000 https://valonashrimp.com/how-many-more-months-will-we-have-to-suffer-indonesians-struggle-with-expensive-cooking-oil-indonesia/ As millions of Indonesians traveled to their hometowns to celebrate Eid al-Fitr, a common struggle was discussed at most family gatherings: the price of cooking oil. “I always organize Eid al-Fitr celebrations for my big family. I cook everything for about 20 of us. But this year is the first time I had to ask […]]]>

As millions of Indonesians traveled to their hometowns to celebrate Eid al-Fitr, a common struggle was discussed at most family gatherings: the price of cooking oil.

“I always organize Eid al-Fitr celebrations for my big family. I cook everything for about 20 of us. But this year is the first time I had to ask them to contribute because that everything is so expensive, especially oil, and I really can’t handle it myself,” said Ellifa Kartini.

Palm oil is the most widely used cooking oil in Indonesia. Like many people, Kartini uses it for his family and for his business. She has run a small catering business from her home in Bekasi, West Java, for 25 years. It also produces and sells traditional biscuits. But the rising price of cooking oil has been extremely difficult for his business.

“Eid al-Fitr is the time of the year when I get the most orders and the biggest turnover. I could produce more than 25 kg of fried cookies for Eid al-Fitr alone. But this year I decided not to take any orders because the price is just too expensive. And if I raise the price of my cookie, I know my customers won’t want to buy it,” he said. she stated.

Ellifa said she needs about six liters of cooking oil every week for her business. On normal days it costs around Rp 15,000 (USD 1.04) per litre, but over the past few months the price has steadily increased, up to Rp 30,000 per litre.

“Before it increased so much, it first disappeared from shops and markets. I have to queue for hours just to get a liter. Sometimes I even have to go to another neighborhood to find it But when it hit Rp 30,000 per litre, I just gave up. The price just doesn’t make sense anymore,” she said.

Oil export ban

Mohammad Faisal, Indonesian executive director of the Center of Reform on Economics (CORE), said there were two main reasons for the price spike: the impact of the pandemic and the war in Ukraine.

Indonesia is the world’s largest producer of palm oil. Faisal said last year the country had seen a spike in Covid cases and that had affected palm oil supply. Producers have been unable to meet demand levels as Covid has impacted workforces and disrupted production.

Meanwhile, supplies of another popular cooking oil – sunflower – were stretched after Russia invaded Ukraine. Russia and Ukraine are among the world’s leading exporters of sunflower oil.

In an attempt to boost supplies to Indonesia, President Joko Widodo has since said April 28 the government would ban the export of cooking oil and its raw materials. He said the policy was designed to ensure “a plentiful and affordable domestic supply of cooking oil”.

Palm oil producers in Indonesia. Most of the country’s cooking oil is made from palm oil. some products. Photography: Dedi Sinuhaji/EPA

Kartini hasn’t noticed any change since the export ban and although she has seen many swings in palm oil prices in the past, this is the worst so far.

“The price has skyrocketed too high. But usually changes like this only last about a month, but that’s the longest. How many more months will we have to suffer? she asked.

According to Statistics Indonesia, the price of palm oil has been rising since October 2021 – and prices have not fallen since the imposition of the export ban.

“Part of our life”

In regions outside the island of Java, palm oil has become even rarer. Yulian Juita, 32, who lives in Manggarai, East Nusa Tenggara, said the cooking oil had been missing for months. When it appeared, the price had doubled.

“But I’ll buy it anyway, because we need it. I’m lucky because I only cook for my toddler and my husband. But I do my best to be more frugal when using it,” she said.

Juita said she used to consume around three liters a month, but now tries to use only half that amount.

In March, former President Megawati Soekarnoputri caused an uproar when she criticized mothers for making so much fried food and said they should boil or steam instead.

“Cooking oil is a very important part of our lives, and you can’t underestimate this problem by forcing families to boil everything instead of frying it. I’ve tried, but it’s not not so simple. I have a three-year-old and his favorite food is fried fish. It’s hard to give him only boiled or steamed food,” Juita said.

Some experts have criticized the government’s decision to ban cooking oil exports, saying it will not help lower prices.

“In theory, banning the export of cooking palm oil and imported raw materials will make domestic supply plentiful,” said Rusli Abdullah, a researcher at the Institute for Economic and Social Development. finance (Indef).

“However, this does not guarantee that contractors will release their oil or raw materials when prices are not attractive,” he said.

CORE’s Faisal called the move “rushed” and said the export ban could have wide-ranging repercussions.

“The ban…has the potential to cause huge losses to industry players, many of whom may not be related to cooking oil. [ban],” he said.

Kartini says she hopes cooking oil prices will come down soon, as her business is her family’s main source of income.

“I hope this will end soon, I’m really afraid it could affect my ability to pay for my children’s education if this continues. It really kills us,” she said.

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Fish papillotes with pineapple sorbet: Yotam Ottolenghi’s herbal cooking recipes | Food https://valonashrimp.com/fish-papillotes-with-pineapple-sorbet-yotam-ottolenghis-herbal-cooking-recipes-food/ Sat, 07 May 2022 08:30:00 +0000 https://valonashrimp.com/fish-papillotes-with-pineapple-sorbet-yotam-ottolenghis-herbal-cooking-recipes-food/ IIt’s not a spoiler to say that I like herbs. Big fat bouquets make me happy and hungry, and I can’t imagine cooking without them. I love them fresh, as a pretty and flavorful finishing touch, I love them baked and wilted in sweet and savory preparations, and I love them blitzed in vinaigrettes and […]]]>

IIt’s not a spoiler to say that I like herbs. Big fat bouquets make me happy and hungry, and I can’t imagine cooking without them. I love them fresh, as a pretty and flavorful finishing touch, I love them baked and wilted in sweet and savory preparations, and I love them blitzed in vinaigrettes and buttered. In fact, I even dream a bit of writing a book on herbs, but I remember Mark Diacono and Caz Hildebrand already beating me, with Herb: A Cook’s Companion and Herbarium, respectively. Using herbs from field to fork is a gift we all have within our reach.

Steamed sea bream with herb fenugreek butter and coconut salsa (top photo)

cooking fish Foil is such an easy way to steam it perfectly: all the flavors are there, and it’s fun to present the dish in its package. Butter is a clever way to use up all the old herbs in your fridge. It will make more than you need here, so wrap any excess tightly and freeze for up to three months – perfect for garlic bread or on a roast chicken.

Preparation 12 minutes
To cook 1h25
Serves 4

For the herb butter
1 large garlic bulbleft whole, plus 2 cloves, peeled and crushed
2 teaspoons olive oil
Salt and black pepper
20g of parsley
coarsely chopped
20g coriandercoarsely chopped
1 tbsp mint leavescoarsely chopped
½ teaspoon of fenugreek seedsfinely ground in a mortar or spice grinder
½ teaspoon hot pepper flakes
1½ teaspoon lime zest
120 g unsalted butter at room temperature
cut into 1cm cubes

For the coconut salsa
25g coconut flakes (aka coconut chips)
1 teaspoon icing sugar
1 teaspoon lime juice

For packages
250g cherry tomatoes
1 large lemongrass stick
trimmed and thinly sliced
20g of gingerpeeled and finely grated
200ml whole coconut milk
8 Tenderstem broccoli stalks (120g), thicker stems cut in half lengthwise
4 sea bream fillets (or other delicate white fish), skin on
1 red peppercut into thin rounds
2 tablespoons parsley leaves
1 tablespoon coriander leaves
1 tbsp mint leaves
1 teaspoon lime juice

Heat the oven to 240C (220C fan)/475F/Gas 9. Cut off and discard the top of the garlic bulb to reveal the cloves. Place the garlic cut side up on a small square of aluminum foil, pour the oil over it and sprinkle with a pinch of salt. Wrap the foil tightly around the bulb of garlic and roast for 20 minutes, until softened. Remove and cool, then squeeze the flesh from the papery skins; discard the skins.

Lower the oven to 180 C (160 C fan)/350 F/Gas 4. To make the butter, place the parsley, cilantro, mint, roasted garlic flesh and raw crushed garlic in a food processor with a quarter teaspoon of salt and blitz until finely chopped. Add the fenugreek, chili flakes, lime zest and butter, mix for a minute until smooth, then scrape into a bowl.

For the salsa, combine the coconut, sugar, and lime juice in a bowl, then spread evenly on a small parchment-lined baking sheet. Toast in the oven for six minutes, tossing the mixture once halfway through cooking, until lightly caramelized, then remove and let cool.

Raise the oven temperature to 220C (200C)/425F/Gas 7. As it heats up, put a large skillet over high heat and, once hot, char the tomatoes, turning them over occasionally, for five minutes, then transfer to a plate.

Cut 4 squares of 30 cm of baking paper. Combine the lemongrass, grated ginger and coconut milk in a small bowl, crumple the parchment paper squares into bowls and divide the lemongrass mixture between them. Divide the charred tomatoes and broccoli between the packets, then place a fillet of fish on top, skin side down. Sprinkle each portion with an eighth of a teaspoon of salt and a good ground pepper and, using a spoon, spread 20 g of herb butter on each fillet. Bring the edges of the package over the fish, then seal securely by crimping the edges together.

Place the bites on a large baking sheet and bake for 12 minutes. Meanwhile, combine the fresh chili, remaining herbs, lime juice and toasted coconut mixture in a small bowl. Divide the packets into four shallow bowls, cut each one off the top with scissors, pour the salsa over them and serve hot.

Coconut Tahini Green Goddess with Sunflower Seed Dukkah

Yotam Ottolenghi’s Coconut Tahini Green Goddess with Sunflower Seed Dukkah.

It’s a great way to use up excess herbs, so replace them with what you have on hand. Sunflower seed dukkah is so addictive, you’ll want to sprinkle it on everything. If desired, double the amount and store the excess in an airtight jar, where it will keep for up to two weeks.

Preparation 20 mins
To cook 15 mins
Serves 6

For dressing
140ml whole coconut milk
75ml olive oil
10g mint leaves
35g chives
finely chopped
20g parsley leaves
1 clove of garlic
peeled and crushed
2 tablespoons of tahini
3 tablespoons lime juice (from 1 to 2 limes)
½ teaspoon of maple syrup
flake salt

For the dukkah
50g of sunflower seeds
1½ tsp urfa pepper flakes
1½ teaspoon Aleppo pepper flakes
⅛ teaspoon ground turmeric
⅛ teaspoon Kashmiri chili powder
or paprika
¼ teaspoon caster sugar

For the salad
1 small white chicoryseparate sheets (60g)
1 small red chicoryseparate sheets (60g)
1 small gem lettuceseparate sheets
1 small Lebanese cucumbercut into 6cm long sticks (or ½ regular cucumber, watery seeds removed, flesh cut into 6cm long sticks)
100 g rainbow radishes (or normal)leaves left, halved lengthwise

Put the coconut milk in a small saucepan over medium heat, heat gently for two to three minutes, until smoking (this will prevent it from splitting when blitzing). Remove from the heat, add a tablespoon of water and let cool.

Once the coconut milk has cooled, put it in a blender with 60 ml of olive oil, the herbs and the garlic, and blend for two to three minutes, until smooth. Pour into a bowl and stir in the tahini, lime juice, maple syrup and three-quarters of a teaspoon of flaked salt.

For the dukkah, partially crack the sunflower seeds in a mortar giving them two or three turns of the pestle, then pour them into a small bowl. Put all the remaining dukkah ingredients into the mortar, coarsely crush, then pour into the bowl of sunflower seeds and mix.

To assemble, cleverly arrange the leaves, cucumber and radishes on a platter. Drizzle with the remaining tablespoon of oil and sprinkle with a quarter teaspoon of flaked salt and a handful of dukkah. Serve the green goddess dressing and remaining dukkah in bowls on the side for dipping.

Pineapple and herb sorbet with candied fennel seeds

Yotam Ottolenghi's pineapple and herb sorbet with candied fennel seeds.
Yotam Ottolenghi’s pineapple and herb sorbet with candied fennel seeds.

The secret to keeping this sorbet vibrant green and grassy is to semi-freeze the pineapple first and churn it while it’s nice and cold. Candied fennel seeds are optional and will do more than you need here; save any extras for snacking or sprinkling on desserts. You will need an ice cream maker for this.

Preparation 10 minutes
Freeze 3h30+
To cook 30 minutes
Serves 6

1 large ripe pineapple (or 2 smaller ones)
15g basil leaves
15g mint leaves
5g parsley leaves
150g glucose syrup
50g caster sugar

3 limes
– 1 juice, to obtain 1 tablespoon, the rest cut into 6 wedges each, to serve
3 tablespoons good quality extra virgin olive oilto serve

For the candied fennel seeds (optional)
30g caster sugar
20g fennel seeds

Hull and slice the pineapple, then cut and discard the skin and eyes. Cut around the core (use a pineapple corer, if you have one) and discard, then cut the flesh into 3cm pieces. Weigh 600g (stick with whatever extra you have), spread out on a small freezer safe tray and freeze for 1.5 to 2 hours (by this time the pieces won’t be quite frozen) . by).

Prepare your ice cream maker. Put the herbs, glucose, sugar, two tablespoons of water, lime juice, and frozen pineapple into a blender and blitz, stopping occasionally to stir, if necessary, until combined. until the mixture is very smooth and without lumps. This should take about five minutes in total (or less if you have a very powerful blender).

When the ice cream maker is ready, pour in the cold pineapple mixture, blend until soft, then transfer to an airtight container and freeze for at least two hours.

Meanwhile, prepare the candied fennel, if using. Put 25ml of water and the sugar in a small saucepan over medium-high heat. Stir to dissolve, then bring to a boil and cook, stirring often, for exactly two minutes – the syrup should bubble very vigorously and bubble big, but not start to color at all. After two minutes, reduce the heat to medium-low, add the fennel seeds, and stir for 90 seconds to three minutes, until they begin to dry out, turn white, and coat with a white, sandy mixture. Don’t take the mixture past this point or the sugar will darken and caramelize, which you don’t want. Remove the pan from the heat, stir to separate the seeds as much as possible, then pour onto a small tray or plate and let cool.

To serve, divide the sorbet among six bowls, squeeze over a wedge of lime, drizzle each serving with a teaspoon and a half of good olive oil and garnish with a sprinkle of fennel seeds.

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Barbara Sims of BJ’s Restaurant remains the heart and soul of a gentrified Beacon https://valonashrimp.com/barbara-sims-of-bjs-restaurant-remains-the-heart-and-soul-of-a-gentrified-beacon/ Thu, 05 May 2022 15:35:11 +0000 https://valonashrimp.com/barbara-sims-of-bjs-restaurant-remains-the-heart-and-soul-of-a-gentrified-beacon/ The commotion is on a recent afternoon at BJ’s Restaurant in Beacon, and owner Barbara Sims rakes giant chicken wings through a liner pan before dropping them into a metal basket. The kitchen soon erupts with the unmistakable sound of fried chicken, and a regular customer pokes his head in his domain: “I’ll order fries […]]]>

The commotion is on a recent afternoon at BJ’s Restaurant in Beacon, and owner Barbara Sims rakes giant chicken wings through a liner pan before dropping them into a metal basket. The kitchen soon erupts with the unmistakable sound of fried chicken, and a regular customer pokes his head in his domain: “I’ll order fries with that, Miss Barbara.”

“Coming soon,” says the octogenarian Empress of BJ’s, which The Sims opened in 1978 (213 Main Street.).

It’s an institution in a city that has seen a lot of change over the past 44 years. At the time, she recalls, there were only three restaurants in Beacon — BJs, Quinn’s and the Yankee Clipper restaurant — and when she bought the building, it was abandoned except for a few sans -shelters who squatted there. Sims recalls tracking down the owner, who was bankrupt “and he sold it to me very cheaply”.

The Sims have set up the upstairs apartments, which she rents out along with several other units she owns around town, and got to work cooking classic American soul food: ribs, fried fish, fried chicken (with or without waffles), macaroni and cheese, green cabbage, sweet potato pie.

Beacon has changed a lot over the years, but its menu hasn’t changed, except don’t expect to order chitlins these days. “I used to make these,” she says of the fried large intestines of a pig or a cow, “but they stunk the whole place!”

Even though Sims describes herself as retired — the Beacon-born and raised local worked at the New York Veteran’s Home in Montrose until 1991 — she’s in the kitchen seven days a week tending to her tenants’ needs. .

She’s legendary in the city and in old media profiles for filleting hundreds of pounds of fish at a time — porgy, tilapia and whiting are on the menu — which she says she used to buy herself at Hunt’s Point in the Bronx. Today, she uses an outfitter who sources and cleans the fish, “for a very high price,” she says. “At the time, I couldn’t allow anyone else to do it.”

Barbara Sims purchased the building that houses BJ’s Restaurant in Beacon in 1978 and has become a community fixture.

Tom Gogola

When his mother was still alive, she helped run the restaurant while Sims worked day shifts and slowly expanded the business. “When I opened, we were doing maybe $50 a day in sales,” she says. But she had the tenants upstairs to cover her mortgage as she envisioned the day when she could devote her full attention to the kitchen.

The story of BJ’s Soul Food also tells the story of the gentrification that has taken place in Beacon in recent years. Until 2018, says Sims, “my business was 80% black. The majority of my clients who couldn’t afford to stay in Beacon (and) moved to Poughkeepsie or whatever, or they died. Now about 20% of my people are black. I’m not complaining – all the tourists and everyone else wherever they come from, who came to town, it’s fine.

She says some of her best-known clients have included the Reverend Al Sharpton and others associated with the controversial case involving Tawana Brawley of Wappingers Falls in the 1980s. “It was their usual place through it all,” recalls Sims.

Sims comes from a family of seven children; his father worked his whole life at the old Brockway Brickyard, and his mother did housework – and taught the Sims how to cook her tasty, homey meals. She has two children, two grandchildren and two grandchildren; one of his daughters, Brenda, works at the restaurant and will likely take over the business, Sims says, though she is quick to add that she has no plans to quit cooking.

“I retired from my (veteran) job since 1991,” she says. “I’m going to work until I can’t work anymore.” She pauses for effect. “Although I’m a little tired of eating my own food. I haven’t cooked at home in I don’t know how many years.

As for his recipes, they are a well-kept secret. Don’t expect a “Barbara Sims cookbook” anytime soon, she says. “Not at all! When I leave, everything goes with me.

The walls of BJ’s are adorned with Beacon civic awards that highlight Sims’ entrepreneurial spirit and contributions to the community, as well as a poster of Martin Luther King and a Hale Woodruff print from the popular Amistad Mutiny series of the black painter. A bust of Egyptian Queen Nefertiti is adorned with a Black Lives Matter t-shirt, and Rachael Ray’s cooking show airs on the home TV. Frank’s hot sauce is a staple at every table and booth. Places smell of coffee and fried chicken (BJ’s does a quick breakfast) as Sims hold court in the kitchen and at a booth just outside.

She is asked if she can confirm or deny the rumors around Beacon that she is a millionaire. She leans back in the cabin and lets out a high-pitched chuckle. “Oh, I can deny it! Now I have to put this chicken. Want something to eat while you’re here?

More flavors from the Hudson Valley



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Summer camp for young men aims to restore manhood – Mississippi’s Best Community Newspaper https://valonashrimp.com/summer-camp-for-young-men-aims-to-restore-manhood-mississippis-best-community-newspaper/ Tue, 03 May 2022 20:08:49 +0000 https://valonashrimp.com/summer-camp-for-young-men-aims-to-restore-manhood-mississippis-best-community-newspaper/ NATCHEZ — A new summer camp for young men ages 10 to 18 aims to teach them the life skills they need, as well as build friendships and mentors while having fun. JaMar White of Natchez, who hosts the first of what he hopes will be several such camps a year, said the camp is […]]]>

NATCHEZ — A new summer camp for young men ages 10 to 18 aims to teach them the life skills they need, as well as build friendships and mentors while having fun.

JaMar White of Natchez, who hosts the first of what he hopes will be several such camps a year, said the camp is called Restoring Manhood. White said he decided to start the camp when he saw a real need in the community.

“I want to give back to this community, and what better way to do that than to teach young men the skills they need in life,” White said. “We will teach skills that every young man should have.”

The camp is scheduled for June 6-11 at Bob M. Dearing Natchez State Park. It’s immersive in nature, White said. Campers and volunteers will spend the entire week together, housed in state park cabins.

“We will have different guest speakers every day on different topics, including career planning after high school and college. We are going to ensure that young men know about the opportunities to learn a trade and that they know that they can be as successful as someone who spends 16 years in school and obtains a doctorate”, a- he declared.

Campers will learn financial literacy. They will learn to fish and cook, learn how to change a tire and the basics of changing oil in a vehicle, as well as how to tie a tie.

The camp will also include state park hikes with the goal of teaching the young men about the native nature of our area, as well as helping them enjoy the outdoors.

White said a number of Greek Natchez fraternities volunteered to help out at the camp.

“Most of the support we’ve received comes from male fraternities,” he said.

As people learn about the camp, they call White to offer help or to sponsor a young man.

The cost is $100, which will pay for all supplies, food, and lodging for the week.

“We get great responses from people from all walks of life. We even have young men signed up from as far away as Port Gibson and Rolling Fork,” he said. “Each young man will leave camp with his personal fishing rod, tie and t-shirt.”

Those who would like to sponsor a young man or would like to donate or volunteer, please call White at 601-920-7499. Please call this number to register a young man for camp.

“This is not the last camp. We plan to make it an annual camp and hope they get better as they go,” he said.

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‘Stanley Tucci: Searching for Italy’ Season 2: What’s on the Menu in Venice https://valonashrimp.com/stanley-tucci-searching-for-italy-season-2-whats-on-the-menu-in-venice/ Mon, 02 May 2022 02:00:03 +0000 https://valonashrimp.com/stanley-tucci-searching-for-italy-season-2-whats-on-the-menu-in-venice/ Editor’s note – Tune in Sundays at 9 p.m. ET to watch all-new episodes of “Stanley Tucci: Searching for Italy.” If you missed the Season 2 premiere where Tucci explores Venice, you can watch it now on CNNgo. Each episode is jam-packed with regional specialties prepared in home kitchens, local hangouts, or Michelin-starred restaurants. In […]]]>
Editor’s note – Tune in Sundays at 9 p.m. ET to watch all-new episodes of “Stanley Tucci: Searching for Italy.” If you missed the Season 2 premiere where Tucci explores Venice, you can watch it now on CNNgo.

Each episode is jam-packed with regional specialties prepared in home kitchens, local hangouts, or Michelin-starred restaurants.

In the first episode of the second season of “In Search of Italy”, Tucci traveled to Venice, an area known for its bridges, gondolas and canals. Below is a guide to where you can find some of the dishes Tucci is looking forward to tasting on screen while he’s there.

CICCHETTI

Tucci began her journey with breakfast at a wine bar. All’ Arco is a family neighborhood bar specializing in cicchetti, that is to say small dishes.

Just like the Spaniards have tapas, the Venetians have cicchetti. These dishes include Bacala (cod), fegato (liver), Wick (local crabs), sardines and radicchio, as well as hams and cheeses, placed on a piece of bread or fried polenta.

Breakfast at the All’ Arco is served standing up with a glass of wine.

BACCALA MANTECATO

Next, Osteria Ai 4 Feri Stori, a popular hangout for gondoliers known for its modern take on cicchetti. A gondolier told Tucci that the restaurant is cicchetti heaven, and it was there that he tried some of Venice’s signature dishes, including sardinian in saor (sardines in their flavor) and mantecato trayor whipped cod.

baccala mantecato is “a snack that is to Venice what pizza is to Naples” and “it’s available all over the city,” Tucci said.

RISOTTO NERO DI SEPPIA

The couple took a gondola down the Grand Canal to the nearly 1,000-year-old Rialto fish market to collect cuttlefish (sepia in Italian), cousin of the squid and the octopus.

The preparation of the dish requires three steps. First, you remove the ink sacs from the cuttlefish and use the ink to color the dish black. The squid is braised with garlic, onion, white wine and tomatoes. Second, the rice is grilled and cooked in fish stock. Finally, the fish and the ink are added to the risotto rice. It is garnished with parmesan.

“Perfect!” Tucci said after his first bite. “Not fluffy, not mushy.”

Risotto nero di seppia is so great that it is claimed by some neighboring countries as their own invention. There’s no way to really know for sure, but in the Venetian cookbook, the ink has been dry for a very long time.

DUCK RAGE

Seafood clearly dominates menus in Venice. But there is another protein that has become a favorite among Venetians.

Duck is a local specialty often served in the fall. It is eaten with pasta.

To find out more, Tucci had a drink at Harry’s Bar, once a favorite of the late author Ernest Hemingway, and chatted with Andrea de Robilac, a Venetian historian with a passion for ducks and hunting.

“It was a great tradition of the Doge, the ruling authority here in Venice, to give five ducks to each member of the main legislative body of Venice, but there were about a thousand, so that meant 5,000 ducks,” said said Robilac. . “So imagine the rush! »

And of course their conversation led to a duck hunting adventure.

Tucci traveled to Valle Pierimpie, a vast wetland about 20 miles from Venice, to go duck hunting. Tucci’s hunting partner, Oliver Martini, shot 15 ducks.

Tucci then went to Villa 600, on the island of Torcello, to taste how the locals prepare duck. He ordered the classic Venetian duck stew (sugo d’anatra in Italian). It is traditionally made with cinnamon, orange, white wine and mixed with pappardelle pasta. Villa’s 600 version is served with gnocchi.

“It has a sweetness to it,” Tucci said of trying the duck stew. “It tastes rich, so you don’t need a lot of it.”

CALAMARI TO TAKE AWAY

The feast continued when Tucci joined journalist Maurizio Denez for a Venetian snack of calamari sprinkled with sea salt. It was served in a portable paper cone called Scartosso in Italian.

The fried treat can be a mixture of fried fish and shellfish – or just calamari, like Tucci’s version.

There is evidence of scartosso dating back to the 1600s, according to Visit Venezia.

Denez said that this street snack was originally the meeting place for fishermen. “You would just go out of your house and catch little crabs and little fish and then fry them,” Denez said.

DORONA WINE

And you can’t forget the wine. Matteo Bisol showed Tucci around perhaps the most unique vineyard in Italy, located on the island of Mazzorbo, about 8 km northeast of Venice.

Wine has played a leading role in the very ancient history of Venice. Piazza San Marco, Venice’s most famous square, was actually a vineyard until 1100 AD.

The ancient white-skinned grapes, called Dorona di Venezia, have adapted to survive the salty conditions of frequently flooded vineyards. They can only grow in Venetian lagoons, Matteo said.

For centuries Venetians drank this local wine, but then it disappeared – or so they thought – after the 1966 high water, or high tide. In 2001, Matteo’s father, Gianluca Bisol, discovered some surviving plants and brought them to Mazzorbo.

Today, the Venissa winery is the only winery producing Dorona wine in the world, Matteo said.

Tucci sampled a bottle of the vineyard. “It’s amazing. It’s really fresh. It’s dry and it’s sweet, it’s so sweet,” Tucci said.

GOLDEN SPAGHETTI

Chef Chiara Pavan runs the Michelin-starred restaurant near Venice that uses ingredients from the salty ground, like velvet asparagus and artichokes. Don’t miss “Stanley Tucci: In Search of Italy” on CNN Sundays at 9 p.m. ET/PT.
There are only three restaurants on the entire island of Mazzorbo, including a restaurant associated with the winery, Venissa.

Chef Chiara Pavan runs the Michelin-starred restaurant and uses ingredients from the salty ground, like velvet asparagus and artichokes.

Pavan showed Tucci how to make untraditional golden spaghetti, topped with real foil covered in edible gold.

“By balancing them with sweet and sour tastes, Chiara turns salty ingredients into gold,” Tucci said. “It’s culinary alchemy.”

AFGHAN CUISINE

Tucci went to Cannaregio, one of the six oldest parts of Venice, home to something new and spicy.

There he met Hamed Ahmadi, who fled the Taliban in Afghanistan and arrived in Italy in 2006. Today, the 25-year-old runs Orient Experience, an Afghan restaurant run by former refugees. They keep the connection to their culture alive through the dishes they add to the menu.

Tucci tried pulao kabuli (a spicy lamb pilaf) and Afghan dumplings with vegetables.

“There’s a multiplicity of flavors here. There’s turmeric in the kabuli and cardamom in the rice. Taste bought in Venice by Hamed’s team,” Tucci said.

“Some Italian politicians see the arrival of foreign food, and the people who bring it, as a bad thing. I say adding new ingredients makes the stew richer. It’s the Venetian way,” a- he added.

PORK GOULASH

Now is the time to explore one of Italy’s least explored regions. In the far northeast of Italy lies Friuli-Venezia Giulia, which borders both Austria and Slovenia.

This region was once the gateway for spices from Asia entering Italy, making it a culinary goldmine.

With Polish, Jewish and Italian roots, chef Antonia Klugmann is fusion personified.

These influences inspire his menu at his Michelin-starred Friuli-Venezia Giulia restaurant called L’Argine a Vencó.

Klugmann buys his meat from Slovenia and his fish from Italy; her vegetables come from her garden or local markets. Its ever-changing menu includes daring dishes like braised snail and mayonnaise, as well as beetroot, tomato and elderberry gnocchi.

For Tucci, she cooked up a dish inspired by her grandmother called pork goulash, which includes fresh grapes, dried apricots and herbs.

“Love it! It’s the perfect blend of so many different cultures in one bowl,” Tucci said as she tried it.

The rich fusion of Friuli tastes stems in part from a history of openness to outside influences that pervades Venice. This is the secret of their culinary success.

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