Fish cook – Valona Shrimp http://valonashrimp.com/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 12:40:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://valonashrimp.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.jpg Fish cook – Valona Shrimp http://valonashrimp.com/ 32 32 Resolution to eat healthy? I got you! https://valonashrimp.com/resolution-to-eat-healthy-i-got-you/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 12:34:15 +0000 https://valonashrimp.com/resolution-to-eat-healthy-i-got-you/ You won’t even know you’re eating healthy when you devour this delicious dish. It’s only 370 calories per serving and packed with spicy flavor from the Ragin’ Cajun spice blend. The nutritional content is off the charts and will make this New Year’s resolution easy as pie…well, you can’t have the pie, but you won’t […]]]>

You won’t even know you’re eating healthy when you devour this delicious dish. It’s only 370 calories per serving and packed with spicy flavor from the Ragin’ Cajun spice blend. The nutritional content is off the charts and will make this New Year’s resolution easy as pie…well, you can’t have the pie, but you won’t need it!
Ragin’ Cajun Lemony Haddock over Corn, Lima and Black Bean Succotash
The Succotash:
4 slices of raw bacon
1 medium onion, chopped
1 cup leeks, chopped
6 garlic cloves, minced
1 red bell pepper, chopped
3 cups frozen corn, thawed
2 cups frozen lima beans, thawed
1 can 15.25 oz black beans, drained and rinsed
1 teaspoon of salt
1 1⁄2 teaspoons black pepper
1 cup 1% low fat milk
2 cups cherry or grape tomatoes, halved
1⁄4 cup fresh basil leaves, chopped if large or whole if small (plus more for garnish)
Fish:
1 1⁄2 pounds skinless haddock fillets (or other fish such as cod, plaice, or salmon)
1 1⁄2 tablespoons Dish off the Block Ragin’ Cajun Spice Blend
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 lemon

Cook bacon in a large, deep skillet until crisp, drain on paper towel and cut into small pieces. Put aside. Reserve 1 tablespoon of bacon fat in the skillet.
Add the onion, leeks and garlic to the reserved drippings and cook until tender and fragrant, stirring frequently, about 3 to 4 minutes. Add red pepper, corn, lima beans, black beans, salt and black pepper to skillet and cook 3-4 minutes, stirring frequently.
Add the milk, tomatoes and basil to the skillet and cook 2 to 3 minutes more, stirring to combine, and let the milk coat the vegetables. Keep warm until ready to serve.
Pat the haddock fillets dry with paper towel to absorb any excess moisture and season both sides with Cajun seasoning. Heat the olive oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add the seasoned fillets upside down to the hot skillet. Sear 2 to 3 minutes on the first side then flip. Cut the lemon in half and squeeze the juice through a sieve all over the top of the fish. Cook another 2 to 3 minutes on the other side until the fish is tender in the center and flakes easily with a fork.
Serve about 1 cup of succotash on a plate and garnish with a 4-ounce piece of fish. Garnish with basil leaves and more lemon. Devour!
Get hundreds of accessible and simply delicious recipes on Pam’s blog www.dishofftheblock.com and follow her on FB @dishofftheblock and Instagram @dishblock for new recipes and tips! You can also get his Ragin’ Cajun and other spice blends on the island at BIG or the Block Island Trading Company! If you’re not on BI, order his spices and cookbook from his website.

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FISH, chef offers a virtual cooking class | News, Sports, Jobs – SANIBEL-CAPTIVA https://valonashrimp.com/fish-chef-offers-a-virtual-cooking-class-news-sports-jobs-sanibel-captiva/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 16:33:51 +0000 https://valonashrimp.com/fish-chef-offers-a-virtual-cooking-class-news-sports-jobs-sanibel-captiva/ PHOTO PROVIDED Leslie Adams Sanibel-Captiva’s FISH takes registrations for its next “Cooking with Leslie” lesson, which is scheduled for January 20 from 2 p.m. via Zoom and is open to those who live on the islands. Recipes will be presented in a classroom style while participants cook together as a group. Ingredients can be home […]]]>

PHOTO PROVIDED Leslie Adams

Sanibel-Captiva’s FISH takes registrations for its next “Cooking with Leslie” lesson, which is scheduled for January 20 from 2 p.m. via Zoom and is open to those who live on the islands.

Recipes will be presented in a classroom style while participants cook together as a group. Ingredients can be home delivered to those in Sanibel or Captiva on the day of the event and are compliments of FISH. Participants can also purchase the ingredients themselves with a list provided in advance by FISH

The recipe will be a healthy version of the Chicken Almandine casserole dish, with Paleo / Keto brownies.

Both recipes will serve six, but can be frozen for future meals.

“I am very happy to learn how to make a healthier version of this popular casserole dish, which will fit in perfectly with New Year’s resolutions.” FISH Education and Outreach Director Jennifer Pagano said.

Chef and owner of Catering by Leslie Adams, Adams will lead the lesson. Former owner of the award-winning restaurant Rosie’s Deli on Sanibel, she sold it after six years to devote her energy and talents as a catering and private chef on the islands, which she did for 14 years. Adams trained at the California Culinary Academy in San Francisco and took courses at Le Cordon Bleu in Paris.

Registration is required by January 18 at 239-472-4775; indicate if ingredients and delivery are required. Once registered, FISH will provide the link and meeting ID number for webinar access.

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A Jamaican Patty pop-up at Huda Rittenhouse https://valonashrimp.com/a-jamaican-patty-pop-up-at-huda-rittenhouse/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 20:13:59 +0000 https://valonashrimp.com/a-jamaican-patty-pop-up-at-huda-rittenhouse/ News Plus, Kanella changes hands, the Pineville Tavern gets a renowned chef and more Philly restaurant news you need to know. Passionate foodies and restaurant newbies love Foobooz. Sign up now for our bi-weekly newsletter. Tevon Tyrell from Huda | Photo by Mike Prince and courtesy of Peter Breslow Hi, buckaroos. And welcome to another […]]]>

News

Plus, Kanella changes hands, the Pineville Tavern gets a renowned chef and more Philly restaurant news you need to know.


Tevon Tyrell from Huda | Photo by Mike Prince and courtesy of Peter Breslow

Hi, buckaroos. And welcome to another edition of the Monday Round-Up. This week we have news on beer, bagels, and tomato pies – some sort of weird food and drink trinity in Philadelphia – as well as openings, expansions, a great story on a galette pop-up. Jamaican and a notable change of the guard in Downtown. So let’s get started, will you?

Huda Rittenhouse

Courtesy of Peter Breslow

Pop-up Jamaican Patty in Huda

I’m putting this on your radar just because I think it’s a cool story.

On January 16, Huda – Yehuda Sichel’s Rittenhouse joint sandwich – is hosting their first pop-up event. The cool thing? It’s a pop-up for one of Huda’s line cooks.

Tevon Tyrell has spent years finding his way into some of the best kitchens in Philly. He has toured Serpico, Abe Fisher, Condessa, and currently holds his position at Huda. The point is, Tyrell makes some really good Jamaican food. His family is from Kingston. He grew up in Queens. But he spent his youth watching chefs on television connect with people through their food. And now he wants to do the same.

This is how the idea for this pop-up was born, which Tyrell calls Hummingbird Island. He’s going to connect with his roots and his customers through Jamaican meat patties, which I think is a fantastic idea (but maybe just because I really love Jamaican meat patties). So, on Sunday, he’ll take over Huda’s cooking and sell five different kinds of Jamaican pancakes (beef, vegetables, chicken curry, callaloo and salted fish, beef and cheese) as well as coconut bread from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. will cost you $ 5 to $ 6 apiece. Coconut bread costs two dollars. It’s a really good deal, and you should totally show yourself to support Tyrell – both because I love the story of someone taking a big swing and because Jamaican patties are delicious.

You can check out Tevon Tyrell’s Hummingbird Island Instagram account here.

kanella

Kanella makes a change

Then I posted a letter on one of the oldest social media sites in the world: a restaurant storefront.

This isn’t the first letter Konstantinos Pitsillides stuck to the kitchen window on 10th Street, but it will likely be the last. Kanella – the award-winning and beloved restaurant he opened in 2008 – has closed.

Sort of.

As Pitsillides writes, his version of Kanella closed its doors on December 23 after more than 10 years of bringing Cypriot food, kebabs and falafels to the masses. He walks away for his own reasons: “I have to continue my life path with good energies and positivity. But that’s not the end of the story.

“As for this place, more are to come …” Pitsillides wrote. “Coming soon. Stay tuned.”

And now we know what that meant, as it looks like veteran chef Tayfun Abuska is taking over at 10th and Spruce, promising to keep Kanella’s Mediterranean vibe (and some of Pitsillides’ recipes, as a tribute) while also expanding. attention to include more Greek and Turkish flavors.

More at Applicant, they summarized both the story of Kanella and that of Abuska. You can check it out here if you are interested. But suffice to say, it’s the start of a new chapter for Kanella. I’m curious to see how things are going.

To advance…

Pineville Tavern

Photo courtesy of Peter Breslow

A big name for dollars

Kanella is not the only seal in the region to receive new blood in the galley.

The Pineville Tavern – the darling of the Bucks County food scene for 280 years – just announced that Chef Matt Levin has taken charge of the kitchen and released a brand new winter menu that debuted at the end of last week.

Recently Levin worked as Culinary Director at Brûlée Catering, but at the time he was Executive Chef at Lacroix. And he’s looking to shake things up a bit in Pineville. “For years, I cooked the foods people expected of me,” he says. “I am delighted to launch this new menu and to share what I love with our guests. “

Which means… well, a lot, actually. It’s reinventing some of the favorites, increasing pasta selections, adding vegetarian options to the board, making classics like the Clam Casino and Lobster Mac and Cheese, and new things like Kung Pao Cauliflower Tacos and Hot Nashville Chicken Sandwiches. The pork chop now comes with rye spaetzle and pear and bacon jam. It offers daily specials and a full range of homemade desserts. And on top of all that, the tavern itself is set to launch a 2,250 square foot garden greenhouse that can accommodate 70 people year round.

The greenhouse should be finished next month. Levin is in the kitchen right now, and his new menu debuted last week. Check if you are in the neighborhood.

Leftovers

Here’s one for the old dog / new stuff file …

After 112 years in business, Iannelli’s Bakery in South Philly has learned to use the Internet. Normally open only 15 days a year to walk-in customers, they now offer online ordering and nationwide shipping for their tomato pies, red sauce, and crab sauce – the latter of which is crabs. caught by a harpoon fisherman who catches, cleans and cooks each crab used.

It really is old school.

Pizza kits and cookie kits are coming next, but for now, third-gen owner Vincent Iannelli (who does everything himself) says he only makes 150 tomato pies a month and not a single one. Moreover. When he’s done, he’s done. If they all sell out, you have to wait until next month. In fact, that goes for everything he sells online. He’s available until he’s gone. So you have to wait.

Find out the details (and what’s in stock) on the Iannelli website.

For you beer lovers, the good folks at Troegs would like to let you know that it’s Nugget Nectar’s annual release season. It’s available in bottles and cans wherever Troegs is on the shelves, but they’re doing all kinds of work with local artists to celebrate the release this year, and are reimagining their annual “First Squeeze” events for those of you who do. wish. your nectar fresh from the tap.

For more information about the event, the artists, the glassware they sell, or anything else related to Nectar, check out the website. They have everything you need to know.

It appears that one Bagels & Co. location was not sufficient for the GLU Hospitality team. They are expanding with a second location at 1317 Frankford Avenue in Fishtown (due in the spring) and plan to open five additional locations in and around the city by the end of the year.

Speaking of Fishtown, the Philadelphia Business Journal reports that local seltzer trading company Two Robbers is considering getting into the restaurant game. They envision the space at 1221 Frankford Avenue as the location of a burger restaurant and flagship retail space called Burgers and Seltzers.

Obviously, this will be a place that focuses on selling sashimi and hot milk.

Joke. It will do exactly what the name suggests: sell burgers and seltzer. And while this isn’t the most creative example of a restaurant name I’ve seen recently, at least no one can ever accuse them of being too smart.

No word yet on an opening date. You’ll know more when I know more.

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Anderson: As MNR’s Fish and Wildlife Division reorganizes, jobs lack, outposts darken https://valonashrimp.com/anderson-as-mnrs-fish-and-wildlife-division-reorganizes-jobs-lack-outposts-darken/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 23:40:06 +0000 https://valonashrimp.com/anderson-as-mnrs-fish-and-wildlife-division-reorganizes-jobs-lack-outposts-darken/ Call the Department of Natural Resources office in Tower, northeast Minnesota, about 20 miles southeast of Ely. Ask for the wildlife manager. Chances are you will receive a recording advising you to leave a message, with a response likely from a wildlife manager at Cook’s office at the DNR, 25 miles west of the tower. […]]]>

Call the Department of Natural Resources office in Tower, northeast Minnesota, about 20 miles southeast of Ely.

Ask for the wildlife manager.

Chances are you will receive a recording advising you to leave a message, with a response likely from a wildlife manager at Cook’s office at the DNR, 25 miles west of the tower.

Or call the MNR office at International Falls and ask to speak to a wildlife manager. You will likely receive voicemail there as well, as MNR wildlife staff are no longer stationed at International Falls.

Instead, management issues for deer, bears, wolves and other wildlife along stretches of the Ontario border are now handled from the MNR office in Grand Rapids, 120 miles south of ‘International Falls.

Similar consolidations from the MNR Wildlife Section can be found throughout Minnesota.

The changes follow a reorganization of the wildlife section that began about three years ago by MNR managers with the intention of aligning the section’s staff, fleet and other expenses with the money available.

The wildlife and fisheries sections of MNR are largely funded by the Hunting and Fishing Fund, which is primarily funded through the sales of hunting and fishing licenses.

“In 2017 and 2018, the wildlife section faced budget issues and we needed to develop a staffing plan in line with our funding and implement the plan through attrition,” the director said last week. MNR Fish and Wildlife Division Dave Olfelt. .

“Ultimately we agreed on additional staffing for the wildlife section and then worked to determine how to allocate the staff supported by our budget. Changes have been made statewide. In the northeast, for example, we consolidated the International Falls Wildlife Office with the Grand Rapids regional office.

Likewise, Olfelt said, the area wildlife manager working in Bemidji has been transferred to the DNR Park Rapids office, 80 km to the south. From now on, three wildlife officers are assigned to the work areas of Bemidji and Park Rapids (excluding technicians and seasonal helpers), instead of the previous four.

• • •

Other organizational changes to MNR could be made in the coming weeks, each of which, ultimately, could affect how fish and wildlife are managed in the state – and how effectively the interests of the people are managed. hunters, fishermen and other Minnesotans are served.

On Thursday and Friday, the managers of the MRN, about twenty in total, met by videoconference to try to finalize the possible changes to the Division de la Pêche et de la Faun (including the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife). sections region).

The goal this time, Olfelt said, is not so much cost savings as improved service delivery.

“Before Fish and Wildlife Division Manager Jim Leach retired in 2019 and the position was handed over to me, he initiated a strategic planning process, one of the points of which was to review our structure. organizational, ”said Olfelt. “We started to work on the reorganization. in the fall of 2019. Then COVID hit and it was on the back burner. We now expect this to be done by the spring. “

The process must be completed as at least eight key management positions in the Fish and Wildlife Division are open pending final staffing decisions. Other vacancies at the DNR are also open due to the state government hiring freeze that was lifted last summer.

To support the reorganization process, a consultant gathered information and opinions inside and outside MNR. A hot idea discussed last week was whether, in the four DNR regions (Grand Rapids, Bemidji, St. Paul and New Ulm), the positions of Regional Fisheries Manager and Regional Wildlife Manager should be merged into just one.

Some MNR members say the idea should not be launched, as expertise in both areas is rarely, if ever, held by single people. Wolves, for example, are different from walleyes in every way possible, and expecting a person to have sufficient expertise to make important decisions about each is unrealistic.

The counter-argument, said Olfelt, is: “At what management level in an organization do you need subject matter expertise? At some point, as you progress, it’s more about people and systems and less about biology. “

Last week there was also talk of the division’s fisheries and wildlife research staff, who are widely regarded as some of the best in the country.

“The review we carried out reinforced for us the importance of science-based decision making and we want to make sure that research remains an important part of the organization,” said Olfelt.

There was also discussion as to whether the MNR’s non-game program should be transferred to the Fish and Wildlife Division of MNR’s Ecological and Water Resources Division, where it currently resides.

Habitat that supports no-play in most cases also supports play, one argument goes, and better coordination could be achieved if the two were in the same division. Opponents of the idea counter that non-gaming staff also interact with the parks and trails and forests divisions, and there is no compelling reason to make the switch.

MNR’s fish and wildlife management has already been reorganized.

In the late 1990s, under the leadership of MNR Commissioner Allen Garber, Fish and Wildlife was divided into two divisions. In 2004, they were joined by Commissioner Gene Merriam.

“From all of this,” said Olfelt, “the central question we hope to answer is, ‘Does our organizational structure support or hinder what we need to do? “”


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Leah Itsines Shares Her Simple Chicken Noodle Soup Recipe That Boosts Immunity https://valonashrimp.com/leah-itsines-shares-her-simple-chicken-noodle-soup-recipe-that-boosts-immunity/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 01:44:00 +0000 https://valonashrimp.com/leah-itsines-shares-her-simple-chicken-noodle-soup-recipe-that-boosts-immunity/ Foodie and cook Leah Itsines shared her secret chicken noodle soup recipe – and it’s as delicious as it is filling. “Do you need a winter warmer or an immune boost to fight a cold? This soup is going to be your jam, ”wrote the founder of Yes Please Health. “This quick chicken noodle soup […]]]>

Foodie and cook Leah Itsines shared her secret chicken noodle soup recipe – and it’s as delicious as it is filling.

“Do you need a winter warmer or an immune boost to fight a cold? This soup is going to be your jam, ”wrote the founder of Yes Please Health.

“This quick chicken noodle soup recipe is simply amazing – healthy, easy and so delicious. It’s a great kid’s dinner idea that the whole family can enjoy together.

Foodie and Home Cook Leah Itsines shared her secret recipe for Chicken Noodle Soup – and it’s as delicious as it is filling

Recipe: How to Make Leah Itsines Chicken Noodle Soup

Ingredients

1 whole leek, thinly sliced

1 small brown onion, finely diced

2 small carrots, cut into rings

3 stalks of celery, thinly sliced

1-2 garlic cloves, crushed

3 tablespoons finely chopped parsley

1 tablespoon finely chopped chives

3 cups shredded roast chicken

2 bay leaves

1 tablespoon of dried oregano

2,5L of chicken broth

1 lemon, squeezed

200g pasta with egg noodles (fine)

Olive oil, for cooking

Method

1. In a deep saucepan, heat olive oil over medium to high heat.

2. Add the leek, onion, garlic, celery, parsley, chives and carrot to the pot and cook for 5 minutes, or until slightly softened.

3. Add the chicken broth, bay leaves, oregano and lemon juice to the pot and cook for 15 minutes to enhance the flavor.

4. Add the pasta noodles to the pot and cook for 5 minutes. Place the pulled chicken in the pot and continue cooking the noodles until ready. Add lemon juice and serve!

To start, simply heat the olive oil over medium to high heat in a deep saucepan before adding the leek, brown onion, garlic, celery, parsley, chives and carrot.

Simmer for five minutes until slightly softened and add the chicken broth bay leaves, oregano and lemon juice.

Cook them for 15 minutes to enhance the flavor.

Then add the pasta noodles to the pot and cook for five minutes and place the grated chicken in the pot.

Continue to cook the noodles until ready, add lemon juice and you are good to go.

The vitamins and minerals in the soup are great for giving the immune system a much needed boost, especially with so many diseases currently plaguing Australia.

The vitamins and minerals in the soup are great for giving the immune system a much needed boost, especially with so many diseases currently plaguing Australia.

The vitamins and minerals in the soup are great for giving the immune system a much needed boost, especially with so many diseases currently plaguing Australia.

What is immunity and why are the five f’s the key to boosting it?

“Immunity is a broad term to describe a complex system of bodily functions. There are two key types of defense – barrier and innate, ”Elizabeth MacGregor, head of naturopathic medicine at Endeavor College of Natural Health, told FEMAIL.

“The defense barrier is made up of the skin and lining (mucous membranes) of the eyes, ears, mouth and respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, urinary tract and reproductive tract, all of which act as a physical barrier. against harmful external agents that can cause disease.

“Mucus, sweat, saliva, digestive acids, urine and stool work to eliminate or denature harmful agents. “

Innate immunity, on the other hand, is made up of “non-specific cells” in the body that respond to the presence of a “harmful agent”.

“They will engulf and destroy these. These are present near the defense barrier, ”Ms. MacGregor said.

“The body will also respond by producing inflammation and other chemical messengers to increase circulation to a site, taking white blood cells with it that trigger other immune system responses.”

Dr Jenna Macciochi, senior lecturer in immunology in the UK, said the key to protecting buildings lies in the “five fs” – fats, phytonutrients, fiber, fish and flavor.

Nutritionist and holistic chef Lee Holmes (pictured) said anti-inflammatory foods are essential for healing the gut and improving overall immunity

Nutritionist and holistic chef Lee Holmes (pictured) said anti-inflammatory foods are essential for healing the gut and improving overall immunity

Speaking to FEMAIL previously, Lee Holmes, nutritionist and trained chef, said anti-inflammatory foods and “rainbow eating” are essential for healing the gut and improving overall immunity.

“Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for our bodies to avoid foggy brains, helping to generate energy and boost our immunity. Flax seeds are full of omega-3 fatty acids and high in fiber to promote regular bowel movements, ”Ms. Holmes noted.

“It’s no secret that oily fish like salmon, sardines and tuna are loaded with omega-3 fatty acids, but our friends the fish can also increase dopamine and serotonin levels in the brain.

“Turmeric contains curcumin, a compound that increases the level of immunity boosting proteins in our body. These proteins help fight bacteria and viruses when they try to attack. Turmeric is also a natural anti-inflammatory and pain reliever.

What cooking ingredients will help boost immunity?

Mushrooms

They are a powerhouse to support the immune system and have been recognized by Eastern Doctors for thousands of years for their superpowers. The therapeutic component of these wonderful mushrooms acts as antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and cell regenerating agents.

Ginger

These ingredients provide antibacterial, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action to relieve adverse flu symptoms.

Garlic, chili and onion

Support your body’s natural defense system. Allicin, a compound in garlic, is known to stimulate the response of white blood cells to disease. Onions also contain multiple compounds that boost immunity, while green peppers are rich in vitamin C to build resistance to infections.

Ms. Holmes also recommends plenty of fermented and prebiotic foods, as well as zinc and vitamin C.

“Good plant sources of prebiotics include fresh dandelion greens, Jerusalem artichokes, onions, leeks, chives, garlic, endives, asparagus, radicchio, chicory, shallots, spring onions (onions) greens), beetroot (beetroot), fennel bulbs, green peas, snow peas (mange tout) and Savoy cabbage.

“I encourage you to incorporate some of these delicious prebiotic foods into your diet, it’s your body’s best defense to stay ahead of common bugs and boost your immunity.”

According to Holmes, vitamin C is a powerful anti-oxidant against the flu that can help ward off colds and flu by improving your immune system and increasing the production of antibodies and white blood cells in your body.

“Some ingredients to include are mango, blueberries and citrus. Other well-known sources of vitamin C are broccoli, parsley, cabbage, peppers and dark leafy greens, ”she said.

Zinc is also important because it plays a role in the development and function of the body’s white blood cells which fight infections.

“It is essential to note that the quality of our absorption of zinc is highly dependent on the foods with which it is consumed. The amount of protein in the diet is a factor that contributes to the efficiency of zinc absorption, because zinc binds to protein, ”Ms. Holmes said.

“Zinc is found primarily in lean red meat, chicken, eggs, seafood, especially oysters and shellfish, and in smaller amounts in whole grains, nuts and seeds such as seafood. pumpkin and fortified breakfast cereal. “

For a family of four, add these healthy items to your shopping list:

1 bag of rice of 5kg

2 sachets of 1 kg of quinoa

1 bag of oats of 5 kg

1 bag of 1kg of buckwheat

3 x sachets of pasta

1 5kg bag of red or green lentils

1 2 kg bag of split peas

1 x 1 kg of cannellini beans

7 x garlic bulbs

8 x brown and red onions

Assorted herbs and spices according to your personal preferences

9 x cans of tuna

5 x tins of sardines

1 x jar of anchovies

3 x dozen eggs

7 x canned tomatoes

1 x bottle of apple cider vinegar or balsamic vinegar

1 x kg of nuts of your choice

2 sachets of potatoes

2 x pumpkin

Source: Supercharged food


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How To Make Thai Tom Yum Soup – Recipe | Food https://valonashrimp.com/how-to-make-thai-tom-yum-soup-recipe-food/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://valonashrimp.com/how-to-make-thai-tom-yum-soup-recipe-food/ STangy and sweet and sour, this classic Thai soup is just what I crave this time of year: it’s something to cut through the pleasant festive fug and reset the senses. Although shellfish are a common ingredient, this soup is almost endlessly adaptable, even for vegans: as long as it is vibrant with flavor – […]]]>

STangy and sweet and sour, this classic Thai soup is just what I crave this time of year: it’s something to cut through the pleasant festive fug and reset the senses. Although shellfish are a common ingredient, this soup is almost endlessly adaptable, even for vegans: as long as it is vibrant with flavor – aromatic lime leaves and lemongrass, warming galangal and fresh citrus – you’re on your way. right way.

Preperation 12 minutes
to cook 15 minutes
Serves 4

16 raw prawns, peeled
1 dash of vegetable oil
4 fresh lime makrut leaves
2 stems of lemongrass
2 thick slices of galangal
2 bird peppers
1 tablespoon of palm sugar
, or soft brown sugar
Juice of 1½ limes
2 tablespoons of fish sauce
1 handful of coriander
or Thai basil leaves, to serve

1 A note about prawns

You will need raw, peeled shrimp here. Frozen foods are good, as long as they’re thawed and soft enough to peel, but if your shrimp are very large (or very small), adjust the amounts accordingly. If you only find peeled shrimp, use a quart of light fish or chicken broth (or even just water) and start at step 3.

2 Make a broth with the shrimp shells

Shell the shrimp, keeping the shells and heads, and reserve the flesh for now. Heat the oil in a skillet over medium-high heat, then fry the shells and heads, stirring regularly, until they turn bright pink.

Add a liter of water, bring to a lively boil, then strain into a clean saucepan and discard the spent shells.

3 Prepare the herbs

Tom yum masterclass 2 by Felicity Cloake.  Prepare the aromatics: lime makrut, pepper, coriander, lemongrass.

Roughly tear the linden leaves (avoid using the dried kind here: frozen is fine, but fresh is infinitely better and quite widely available). Crush the lemongrass by pressing on it with the flat of a large knife, then cut it into sections of about 5 cm.

Cut two thick slices of galangal – this ginger-like root is sold in specialty food stores in Southeast Asia and some large supermarkets, but use ginger if you can’t get hold of it.

4 Infuse the broth

Tom yum masterclass by Felicity Cloake 3. Infuse the broth Add the aromatics - lime leaves, lemongrass and galangal - to the broth.

Add the lime leaves, lemongrass and galangal to the pot, bring to a boil again, then simmer gently and steep for five minutes. Meanwhile, thinly slice the peppers, leaving the marrow and seeds inside (depending on your taste for the spices, add more, if desired). Slide the peppers into the broth and let the broth stand for a few more minutes.

5 Add the prawns

Tom yum masterclass 4 from Felicity Cloake: gently cook the shrimp.

Lower the heat to minimum, add the shrimp meat to the broth and cook for about a minute, until they are just pink (be careful not to let the broth boil or cook the prawns too long, otherwise they will will become rubbery).

Tom yum masterclass 5 by Felicity Cloake.  Dressings: limes, fish sauce.

Remove from the heat, stir in the sugar, lime juice and fish sauce, then taste and adjust the seasoning if necessary.

6 Serve with lots of fresh herbs

Pour the soup into bowls, making sure the shrimp are evenly distributed, then tear up the fresh herbs in generous amounts and serve immediately.

It’s not traditional, but you can make the soup bigger by adding cooked rice noodles if you want to make it a more substantial dish, or by adding other vegetables such as chopped tomatoes, mushrooms, or whatever you like. pleases.

Felicity Cloake Tom yum masterclass 6: Pour the soup into bowls, making sure the shrimp are evenly divided, then tear up the fresh herbs in generous amounts and serve immediately.

7 alternatives to shellfish

If you’re not a shellfish fan, prepare it with a good chicken broth and add some ripped cooked chicken (or pork or turkey) at the end, just to warm it up. There is also a more modern and richer variant of tom yum in which coconut or evaporated milk is added at the end of cooking: if you like, prepare only 750 ml of broth and add 300 ml of milk. coconut with seasonings just before serving.

8… or to vegetate

To prepare this vegan dish, use vegetable broth or water and add two round shallots, peeled and cut into quarters, as well as the herbs from step 3. Add two seeded and coarsely chopped tomatoes and 200 g oyster mushrooms , shiitake and / or chopped chestnuts with peppers. Vegan versions of fish sauce are available, and I would recommend buying some for this dish.

9 Other flavors

Vegan or not, you can also add firm diced tofu in place of shrimp; I also find it quite nice with those fried tofu puffs sold in specialty food stores in Southeast Asia. Take a jar of nam prik pao while you’re at it: this rich and sweet chili paste, also available in vegetarian form, is a great addition to tom yum and many other dishes.


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Pecorino Romano adds punch to this meatball soup https://valonashrimp.com/pecorino-romano-adds-punch-to-this-meatball-soup/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 14:30:29 +0000 https://valonashrimp.com/pecorino-romano-adds-punch-to-this-meatball-soup/ I’ve written about the satisfaction of bowl food this time of year, but there’s another style of food that’s just as comforting in winter: meatballs. After all, who doesn’t love a good meatball? Meatballs come in all sizes – small, large, round, patties – with different types of protein (beef, pork, lamb, turkey, chicken, even […]]]>

I’ve written about the satisfaction of bowl food this time of year, but there’s another style of food that’s just as comforting in winter: meatballs. After all, who doesn’t love a good meatball?

Meatballs come in all sizes – small, large, round, patties – with different types of protein (beef, pork, lamb, turkey, chicken, even fish), while the variations effortlessly move away from “meat”. To other star ingredients, such as certain legumes, beans and grains. In other words, meatballs are versatile and universally enjoyable to eat, accommodating most diets and preferences. They’re also efficient and economical, a great way to stretch inexpensive ingredients, and they can be frozen or refrigerated for later use, which is great for an easy weekday meal.

This soup recipe is a two-iron. It’s a steaming bowl of heartwarming soup filled with turkey meatballs floating in nourishing chicken broth. The recipe is inspired by an Italian wedding soup, a classic Italian-American vegetable and meatball soup (and to be clear, the term “marriage” refers to the marriage of its ingredients, not the celebration of a romantic union). There are many versions of an Italian wedding soup. Meatballs can be made with chicken, turkey, beef, or pork, which mix with diced herbs, such as onion, carrot, and celery. For added substance, the soup sometimes includes pasta. In other words, how you prepare it is open to your interpretation, your tastes, and what your fridge contains.

In this recipe, I omitted the pasta and increased the flavor of the broth and meatballs with copious amounts of cheese. While Parmesan is a staple, I find the salty crispness of Pecorino Romano adds more punch and flavor to the meatballs. A piece of cheese crust is added to the broth (a humble and effective no-waste technique for boosting flavor and body), which accentuates a cheesy and umami richness in an otherwise simple soup.

Feel free to use this recipe as a template and make your own changes based on what you have on hand. For example, if you have frozen turkey broth after the holidays, use it for the soup base. Or replace the ground turkey with ground chicken to make the meatballs. If you want to add pasta, try orzo or small, tubular pastas, like ditalini – and note that you may need to add more broth, as the pasta will soak up some during cooking. If you don’t have homemade broth on hand, a good quality store-bought chicken broth will easily replace a quick weekday dinner.

Cheese Turkey Meatball Soup

4 to 5, makes about 16 meatballs

MEATBALLS:

1 pound of ground turkey (or chicken)

1/3 cup panko breadcrumbs

1/4 cup finely grated Pecorino Romano cheese

2 tablespoons chopped Italian parsley leaves

1 large garlic clove, minced

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

1/2 teaspoon dried oregano

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes (optional)

Vegetable oil

SOUPE:

1 medium onion, chopped

1 large carrot, sliced

1 stalk of celery, diced

Kosher salt

5 to 6 cups of chicken broth

parmesan zest in 2 inch pieces

1 bay leaf

1 teaspoon of dried thyme

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

2 cups coarsely chopped spinach or kale leaves

Grated Pecorino Romano or Parmesan cheese for sprinkling

DIRECTIONS

Combine the ingredients for the meatballs (excluding the oil) in a bowl and stir to combine. Form 1-inch meatballs, flatten slightly and place on a plate. Refrigerate for 30 minutes.

Heat 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil in a deep pan or pot. Add the meatballs in a single layer without overcrowding, in batches if necessary. Brown both sides, turning when they come off the pan easily, about 6 minutes. Transfer to a plate covered with a paper towel. (They will finish cooking in the soup.)


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Terry David Haas | Obituary https://valonashrimp.com/terry-david-haas-obituary/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://valonashrimp.com/terry-david-haas-obituary/ COPPELL, TX – Terry David Haas, 66, of Coppell, Texas, passed away suddenly on Wednesday December 15, 2021. Terry was born in El Paso, TX on April 11, 1955 to the late James and Charlene Haas. Terry grew up in Johnson City TN, attended St. John’s Episcopal Church, graduated from Science Hill High School, and […]]]>

COPPELL, TX – Terry David Haas, 66, of Coppell, Texas, passed away suddenly on Wednesday December 15, 2021. Terry was born in El Paso, TX on April 11, 1955 to the late James and Charlene Haas. Terry grew up in Johnson City TN, attended St. John’s Episcopal Church, graduated from Science Hill High School, and attended East Tennessee State University. He then moved to Columbia SC where he met his wife, Joni, and then to Coppell, TX where he spent the last and best 23 years of his life.

Throughout his life, Terry worked in the sports equipment sales in the Southeast and with his brother in the construction industry in South Carolina. Terry has never met a stranger. Her unique ability to talk to anyone has allowed her to network with many friends. Her cheerful personality and severely southern voice will be remembered and missed by many. He enjoyed fishing and hunting with his brothers and friends, followed almost all sports and more recently attended concerts of his old favorite bands on weekends. He was a fantastic cook and was known for his mix of beef jerky and holiday season! Everyone who sampled came back for more every year.

As a devoted husband, father-in-law, brother, brother-in-law and uncle, family was most important to Terry. Not a month has gone by without his nieces and nephews receiving a care package from him in Texas. His grand-nephews were the first recipients of Buc-ee T-shirts in North Carolina! He was known for his Christmas gifts and his affinity for the nicknames of all family members. Terry very much enjoyed his trips home on the Fourth of July and at Christmas, where he reunited with his family and many lifelong friends.

Survivors include his wife, Joni Haas, daughter-in-law, Amanda Wagner (Tyler) of Dallas, Texas; sister, Cindy Meredith of Johnson City, Tennessee; brothers, Mike Haas (Janet) of Irmo, SC: Joe Haas (Leslie) of Johnson City, Tn. Nieces and nephews are Martha Douglas Frye (Tim) of Charlotte, North Carolina; Jim Haas (Jessica) of Charlotte, North Carolina; Kaitlyn Haas Garrison (Patrick) of James Island, South Carolina; Eve Haas of Columbia, South Carolina; Watkins Meredith, Johnson City, Tennessee. The great-nephews are Lane Frye, Wade Frye, George Frye, Henry Haas and Hudson Haas, of Charlotte, North Carolina. Brother-in-law Mike Brown (Jana), niece Ashley Erdman (Brent) and niece Caitlin Atwell (Clay) of Dallas. Step-sister, Amy Fish and her daughter Kenzie from Nashville, Tennessee.

A celebration of Terry’s life will be given later. In lieu of flowers, the family are asking for tributes to be made to one of the three charities that Joni and Terry have supported over the years:

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital; https://www.stjude.org/

St. Joseph’s Indian School; https://www.stjo.org/

St. Labre Indian School; https://www.stlabre.org/

In memory of:

Terry D. Haas


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“Alex vs America”: 5 things to know about Alex Guarnaschelli https://valonashrimp.com/alex-vs-america-5-things-to-know-about-alex-guarnaschelli/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 07:19:00 +0000 https://valonashrimp.com/alex-vs-america-5-things-to-know-about-alex-guarnaschelli/ Are you still looking for a culinary spectacle? If so, then Food Network is ready to bring you something of interest very soon. The makers find one of the best chefs from all over the country to put on an awesome and creative show. Food Network’s “Alex vs America” is a warm invitation to many […]]]>

Are you still looking for a culinary spectacle? If so, then Food Network is ready to bring you something of interest very soon. The makers find one of the best chefs from all over the country to put on an awesome and creative show.

Food Network’s “Alex vs America” is a warm invitation to many brave and talented chefs from all over the United States. The show will feature a total of fifteen talented chefs. All the contestants have to fight with one of the most famous chefs, Alex Guarnaschelli, to win the trophy. In the first episode, three shellfish experts challenge Alex in two intense cooking rounds to successfully win the show. In another episode, Alex competes with the three chocolate makers to create sweet dishes and desserts. The next food show will also be a little mix of comedy and drama. The show will be hosted by Eric Adjepong, bringing a fun twist with his skills as a host.

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Alex guarnaschelli

Chef Alex Guarnaschelli was born on June 20, 1969. She began her international culinary journey at the 3 Michelin star restaurant Guy Savoy based in Paris. The actor gained immense fame and fans after appearing in “Chopped” on the same Food Network in 2012. Alex returned and spent four years of his career in a Butte Chaillot, which earned him a promotion. at the post of sous chef.

Alex Guarnaschelli had a magnificent performance in France. After a great success in France, she returned to the United States and joined Daniel Boulud in his restaurant Daniel. The American chef is currently the manager of the Butter restaurant in New York, and she was also the executive chef of The Darby restaurant before it closed. She beat the nine rival chefs for winning “The Next Iron Chef”.

Eric Adjepong

“Eric Adjepong will be considered the host of“ Alex vs. America. ”Eric was one of the Season 16 finalists of“ Bravo’s Top Chef ”and a Season 17 contestant of“ Top Chef All-Stars. ”He gained immense fame after constant praise from the judges and popularity by all viewers of the show. Eric was born and bought in New York. After graduating with degrees in Culinary Arts and Nutrition, Chef Eric Adjepong has been a cook at several Michelin-starred restaurants based in New York.

Eric Adjepong (IMDb)

If you have an entertainment scoop or story for us, please contact us at (323) 421-7515


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Can you freeze cooked turkey? How long can Christmas leftovers stay in the freezer – and how to freeze safely https://valonashrimp.com/can-you-freeze-cooked-turkey-how-long-can-christmas-leftovers-stay-in-the-freezer-and-how-to-freeze-safely/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 15:06:31 +0000 https://valonashrimp.com/can-you-freeze-cooked-turkey-how-long-can-christmas-leftovers-stay-in-the-freezer-and-how-to-freeze-safely/ Aim to reduce your food waste this holiday season by keeping your Christmas leftovers properly If there’s one thing everyone looks forward to more than the big Christmas dinner, it’s tucking into the leftovers. According to the Food Standards Agency (FSA), there are around 2.4 million cases of food poisoning in the UK each year, […]]]>

Aim to reduce your food waste this holiday season by keeping your Christmas leftovers properly

If there’s one thing everyone looks forward to more than the big Christmas dinner, it’s tucking into the leftovers.

According to the Food Standards Agency (FSA), there are around 2.4 million cases of food poisoning in the UK each year, so it’s important that you know how to cook and store your food properly.

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That’s what you need to know about freezing your leftover turkey – along with other classic Christmas foods.

Can I freeze cooked turkey?

It’s okay to have a lot of leftover Christmas feast, including turkey, but that doesn’t mean you have to throw out what’s left. Turkey keeps very well in the freezer.

The FSA says, “You can freeze cooked turkey, other cooked meats, and cooked and frozen meat dishes.

“It will be safe to eat for a long time, but you may see a deterioration in quality after three to six months. “

Do you know how to properly store leftover turkey? (Photo: Shutterstock)

After thawing the cooked turkey meat, you should eat the leftovers within 24 hours.

The NHS says: ‘Never refreeze raw meat (including poultry) or fish that has been thawed.

“You can cook frozen meat and fish after thawed and then refreeze them. You can refreeze cooked meat and fish once, as long as they have been cooled before freezing.

“If in doubt, do not refreeze. “

What other Christmas foods can you freeze?

You might be surprised to learn that there are a lot of leftovers from your vacation that keep well in the freezer.

Classic Christmas dinner vegetables like potatoes, carrots, parsnips and Brussels sprouts that have been cooked can all be frozen.

If you have any leftover vegetables that weren’t cooked, you can blanch items like carrots, parsnips, and Brussels sprouts in boiling water for a few minutes before placing them in ice water. , cooled then frozen.

Brussels sprouts can split at Christmas – but just because they weren’t eaten doesn’t mean you have to throw them out (Photo: Shutterstock)

Leftover Christmas pudding shouldn’t be wasted – wrap your Christmas pudding in two layers of plastic wrap or foil, and you can freeze it for up to a year.

Other items that can be frozen include:

  • Yogurt
  • Cheese
  • Milk
  • eggs, including hard-boiled eggs
  • Attorney
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Tomatoes
  • Wine
  • Bread

If you are not sure whether something can be frozen, consult the Love food Hate Garbage, which has a handy AZ list of foods and whether you can freeze them.

When freezing your leftovers, it is recommended that you divide them first so that you can easily thaw what you need, rather than defrosting everything and then having to throw away what you failed to use.

What is the difference between “best before” and “best before” dates?

When you buy food, you will notice that on the packaging there will either be a note saying “best before” and / or “eaten” and then a date.

The best before date is about quality – food is still safe to eat after this date, but it is no longer of the highest quality.

The expiration date is about safety, according to the FSA. Foods should not be eaten, cooked or frozen after the expiration date as they could be dangerous.

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